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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Recovery

Posted by on in Sports Nutrtion
Should I stop eating after 6pm?

Q. I am still trying to drop a few kg's. Should I be following the “no eating after a certain time” rule to help me reach my weight-loss goals more easily?

A. This is an interesting question. From an athletes perspective you often find that they are training late into the afternoon, so recovery is important and therefore you'll need to get food in after that 6pm time.
If your already completed your training in the morning or on a rest day then the option to cut off at the 6pm is based on what you have been consuming across the day.

1. Ensure you are fueling adequately all day, not skimping on calories earlier in the day and thus overeating late at night, which can lead to weight gain (or prevent weight loss).

2. Fuel up before all evening workouts with a good, balanced snack, such as half a sandwich, a cup of soup, or yogurt and fruit.

3. Plan your dinners in advance to avoid poor last-minute choices or “grazing” on whatever happens to be in the kitchen when you arrive home late and hungry.

4. Include complex carbs, lean protein, veggies and good fats in your dinner meal, no matter what time the clock says. Good examples include lentils, salmon, kale and avocado or quinoa and beans, lean meat and sautéed veggies.

5. If you are trying to drop a few unwanted kg’s, find other (smart!) places to cut calories, such as that third handful of pretzels at lunch or that extra beer on Friday night.

 

 
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Posted by on in Sports Nutrtion
Cherries - Antioxidants

Cherries are one of the most antioxidant-rich fruit and provide a wide range of health benefits, as well as performance and recovery benefits for athletes. Research has shown that runners who consumed tart cherry juice, twice a day for seven days a week, had strikingly less muscle pain following a long distance run. The post-exercise benefits are astonishing because of the fruit's natural anti-inflammatory components. A recent study from the University of Michigan revealed that a cherry enriched diet lowered total weight, body fat and inflammation, all associated with heart disease.

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Posted by on in Sports Nutrtion
Endura's New Range

Endura have some new and exciting products that we now have in stock, The carb-less electrolytes and the new Performance electrolyte, pop in and check them out.

If you are looking for nutritional support to help you train harder, race faster and recover quicker, then Endura Sports Nutrition has a product for you. Endura understands that athletes can have different nutritional requirements due to the increased physical demands they place on their bodies. This is why Endura have created a range of products for a variety of sporting and endurance needs so you can get the most out of your body when training and competing.

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Posted by on in Sports Nutrtion
Myth Busting: The Truth About Protein

Like training for a marathon, dietary protein is not something to take lightly. Protein is essential for a wide range of bodily processes, most notably the synthesis and maintenance of muscles, enzymes, hormones, bones, cartilage, hair and skin. Plus, protein helps dull hunger, preventing surreptitious midnight fridge raids, and provides an auxiliary fuel source for runners to be used alongside fat and carbohydrate. So, if all you focus on is carbohydrates, your body won’t function to its full potential. Yet, there remains considerable confusion about protein, which may you with no idea how best to approach this macronutrient. Let’s set the record straight.
Myth #1: Only Bodybuilders Need More Protein
To encourage recovery of mile-ravaged muscle, improve strength, help meet increased caloric requirements, and offset protein oxidation during bouts of running, runners undeniably require more dietary protein than someone who only runs to the fridge during halftime. Those undergoing endurance training need about 0.55 to 0.65 grams of protein per pound of body weight. So a 80kg runner needs to eat roughly 88 to 104 grams of protein per day to meet training needs. As intensity, frequency and duration of training increases shoot for the higher end of the protein range. Skimp on this, and your body will borrow from muscle to meet its needs — undermining fitness growth. Fortunately, you should have no trouble meeting your protein quota if you nosh on a varied, whole-food diet
Myth #2: Protein Plays No Role In Replacing Spent Carbohydrate Stores
The power of protein post-exercise doesn’t stop with building lean body mass. Studies have demonstrated that consuming a combination of carbohydrates and protein early during the post-workout period enhances muscular glycogen levels (the storage form of carbohydrate) above what is incurred if only carbohydrates are sent down the gullet. It’s believed that protein stimulates a larger rise in insulin levels, which helps drive more sugar into muscle cells to build more glycogen. Having saturated glycogen stores is vital to running performance, since this is the primary fuel used for high-intensity exercise. Studies suggest that the ideal ratio of carbs and protein in a post-exercise meal is roughly 4:1. So, after a hard run, top that plate of pasta with some meat sauce.
Myth #3: Only Protein From Animals Is Complete
The protein that is found in a hunk of steak is made up of a chain of amino acids, 12 of which can be manufactured by the human body. Another nine, called “essential amino acids,” must be obtained from food because the body is unable to make them from other substances. A complete protein is a protein source that contains all of the essential amino acids and does a better job at repairing and building muscle cells damaged through exercise than an incomplete protein source, which lacks one or more of the key amino acids. Steak lovers like to trumpet protein from animal sources such as beef, chicken, eggs and milk as the only real way to get enough complete protein to meet muscular needs. But on top of providing serious nutritional firepower, the plant foods soy, quinoa, hemp, spirulina, chia, and amaranth do contain a full complement of amino acids, making them a worthy addition to any post-run repast. Plant foods that are incomplete and need a little help, such as brown rice, beans, nuts, and lentils, can be paired together at a meal to form complete proteins. Examples are beans and rice, lentils and corn, and nut butter on whole-grain bread. Whether you are a vegan or meatarian, as long as you consume a varied diet you should have no problem consuming enough high-quality protein to meet your training needs.
Myth #4: Protein ‘Megadosing’ Maximizes Muscular Benefit
A watershed study in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association determined that the ingestion of more than 30 grams of protein (about 113 grams of lean beef) in a single meal does not further boost the stimulation of muscle protein synthesis in both young and elderly persons. Excess protein will be lost to oxidation (at the expense of fat stores) or potentially converted to fat stores. Yes, like carbohydrates, too much protein can pad your midriff with doughy flesh. The upshot is that it’s wise to spread protein intake throughout the day to maximize muscle repair and synthesis instead of loading up during one or two meals.
Myth #5: Protein Powders Are A Must-Have Supplement For Athletes
Those tubs of protein powder do have their merits, particularly fast-digesting whey, which has a very high protein quality score, but it’s very much possible for runners to meet their increased protein requirements from food alone. For example, a post-run smoothie that contains a half-cup Greek yogurt, 1 cup fat-free milk and two tablespoons peanut butter without any powder supplement has about 25 grams of protein. According to a 2009 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 20 grams of protein post-workout is the magic number to stimulate muscle recovery and synthesis. Protein Power Here’s the grub that can help a 80kg runner get enough protein during one day.
2 hard-boiled eggs Protein: 12 grams
2 tins Atlantic salmon Protein: 34 grams
1 cup cooked quinoa Protein: 8 grams
1 cup cooked lentils Protein: 18 grams
1 handful almonds Protein: 6 grams
1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese Protein: 14 grams
1 cup fat-free milk Protein: 8 grams
1 cup cooked oatmeal Protein: 6 grams
Total Protein: 106 grams

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Posted by on in Sports Nutrtion
Recovery - Take another look!

When people think recovery, they immediately think of Protein, and usually it’s a Protein Supplement like Whey or a Pea Protein.
But lately we’ve seen that some proteins haven’t been living up to the recovery statement and customers have reported statements like ‘it’s just not working as well as it did before’ or ‘I’m taking a double serve to get it to work’

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